WiLab Loves: ‘Not There’ Campaign Removes Women From Ads for International Women’s Day

 The Clinton Foundation, in collaboration with the advertising agency Droga5, removed women from about 40 advertisements, posters and other media. The effort was part of a campaign to call attention to gender inequality. Photo from nytimes.com


The Clinton Foundation, in collaboration with the advertising agency Droga5, removed women from about 40 advertisements, posters and other media. The effort was part of a campaign to call attention to gender inequality. Photo from nytimes.com

Women across New York had vanished.

Rosie the Riveter disappeared from her iconic poster in a bus shelter. Serena Williams faded from a giant Beats billboard in Times Square. Gone was Scarlett Johansson from the March cover of Condé Nast’s W magazine.

On Sunday, the Clinton Foundation co-opted some 40 existing advertisements, posters and other media, cutting out the women as part of a campaign to call attention to gender inequality. The stunt, the work of the advertising agency Droga5, was intended to drive online traffic to a report by the foundation’s No Ceilings initiative on the status of women and girls across the globe.

“This is about putting a really important issue in front of people,” said Katie Dowd, director of digital strategy at the Clinton Foundation. “We’re really trying to create a moment that feels meaningful.”

The campaign and the release of the No Ceilings reports coincided with International Women’s Day, observed annually on March 8. The project also marked the 20 years since Hillary Rodham Clinton spoke on women’s rights at a United Nations conference in Beijing.

The Clinton Foundation, founded by former President Bill Clinton, is also using online video, radio and social media to represent the idea that women are “not there” yet in terms of gender equality. Female celebrities, including Cameron Diaz and Amy Poehler, star in a video on the campaign’s website, Not-There.org, that explains the effort.

The media company iHeartMedia removed women’s voices from well-known songs on 186 of its radio stations nationwide. The foundation also put up short videos on the photo-messaging app Snapchat and encouraged users of social media to change their profile pictures to a woman’s blank silhouette. Mrs. Clinton and Chelsea Clinton blacked out their Twitter profile photos as part of the campaign.

Continue reading the full story in The New York Times here.

WILAB LOVES is a series of articles and blog posts from across the web that Women’s iLab supports. This article was written by Sydney Ember and published on nytimes.com on March 8, 2015.