Men Wearing Miniskirts Protest in Turkey

 

Men wearing skirts protest violence against women in Turkey. Photo from CNN.com.

Let’s hear it for the men in Turkey who have been struttin’ their stuff in miniskirts over the past few weeks to protest for women’s rights due to a recent tragedy that occurred on February 11th. A 20-year old woman named Ozgecan Aslan was brutally murdered as she fought back her rapist. She was a typical college student on the last minibus home at night, when her driver began to sexually assault her, beat her with an iron pipe, killed her and burnt her body. The people of Turkey were completely outraged by this horrific act of violence, especially the men. Several of them are now choosing to wear miniskirts to make a statement that no matter what a woman wears, they are never asking to be violated or assaulted. “People try to find excuses for rapes and killings. But they didn’t find any in this case, because Aslan was very innocent, purely innocent. The protest shows that a short skirt is not an excuse for rape.” (Source)

Why a miniskirt?

In turkey and many countries, the length of a woman’s skirt measures their chastity. It sends a certain “message” depending on its length. Protestors say the length of a skirt absolutely does not act as an invitation to be assaulted by a man. “If a miniskirt is responsible for everything, if wearing a miniskirt means immorality and unchastity, if a woman who wears a miniskirt is sending an invitation about what will happen to her, then we are also sending an invitation”, protestors stated in a Facebook page. (Source)
This protest has become massive in Turkey and its amazing to see so many men stripping down and showing their feminine side for Aslan and women all over the world.

To support and remember Ozgecan Aslan, please retweet

#ozgecanicinminietekgiy, which means “wear a miniskirt for Ozgecan”.

Aslan, who lost her life on February 11th 2015

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: CHRISTINE BERARDINO

Christine BerardinoI’m an advocate in law enforcement and am passionate about women’s rights advocacy. I received my Bachelor of Arts from the University of New Hampshire in 2011, with a dual major of Psychology and Justice Studies.

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