Isn’t It Time We Tell Her She’s Pretty Brilliant, Too?

“ENCOURAGE HER LOVE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY AND INSPIRE HER TO CHANGE THE WORLD.”

Verizon’s latest campaign is spot on deconstructing gender stereotypes affecting young girls’ career aspirations in the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) fields.

Inspire Her Mind follows the early life of Samantha, a girl with an obvious love for science at a young age. Samantha loves exploring nature, building model solar systems, and even using electric tools on her model rocket project. She is inspired to change the world by becoming a scientist, engineer or mathematician when she grows up.

What soon becomes evident is the negative impact the conforming messages her parents convey on the activities she loves. By the end of the video, high school age Samantha is more interested in using the science fair display window reflection to apply her lip gloss than she is to enter the competition. The ad concludes with a powerful statistic that Sixty-six percent of 4th grade girls say they like science and math, yet only 18% of college engineering majors are female.

 “OUR WORDS CAN HAVE A HUGE IMPACT.”

Verizon sponsored this incredibly powerful advertising campaign as part of an initiative to excite and engage more girls in their interests in the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) fields. The narrator of the video, Reshma Saujani, is the founder of Girls Who Code, a national nonprofit organization working to close the gender gap in the technology and engineering sectors. The video was part of MAKERS, a digital platform showcasing the largest video collection of stories of trailblazing women.

Women’s iLab are inspired to see trailblazers like Verizon, Reshma, Girls Who Code and MAKERS cultivating the growth of women in innovation and applaud their efforts because really “isn’t it time we tell her she’s pretty brilliant, too?”

LIKE WHAT VERIZON DID THERE?

Be sure to check out GoldieBlox’s viral video The Princess Machine from November that also aims to shake up the way society and maybe even more so parents view girls’ potential in the STEM fields.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Meghan McVeighMeghan McVeigh is a campaign strategist at Visible Measures who loves all things advertising. She received her BSBA from Northeastern University’s D’Amore-McKim School of Business where she fell in love with Boston and its booming start up scene. When she’s not scouring the web for the latest innovating ad campaigns, Meghan enjoys traveling, photography, and brunch.

Location: Boston, MA

Email: MeghanM@womensilab.com

Twitter@meghmcveigh

Sphere(s) of Innovation: Advertising

Read More: Meghan’s WiLab Profile